Our Capabilities

Marketing & Promotional

Our visual tools can be just what your company needs to demonstrate value and to get people thinking about your product or service.

Website Videos

We help you take that important step in creating a video for your website – whether a video introduction to your business, promoting a product or service, or simply a commercial to spread on social media.

Virtual Reality Video

Here at Top Pup, we see broad and massive potential VR applications in advertising and promotional media.

Explainer Videos

A common trend today in online video is the use of Explainer Videos, also known as Infographic videos. These types of videos are often seen on the landing pages of websites that are selling online services.

Business Videos

Over the past two decades, our Dallas video production company, Top Pup Media, has produced hundreds of videos for both small and large clients, even Fortune 500 companies.

Testimonials

A website is essential, but it’s just as essential that people want to stay and engage with you – that means responsive design, navigability and great visuals – and inevitably, that means video.
Expectations

Expectations

Healthy project relationships are built on healthy expectations. To that end, we walk you through what to expect during every step of the video production process.

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Expectations when Producing a Video

\r\nYou need a video, but maybe you haven’t walked through the entire video production process. Or, maybe you need more information on how we work with you to produce your video.\r\n

Here’s what you can expect:

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Initial Meeting

\r\nDuring our initial meeting-either on the phone or in person-we will ask you a variety of questions about your video: length, type, audience, schedule, etc. These questions will help us better understand your production needs. You can expect to spend about 20 to 30 minutes answering each of our questions.\r\n

Estimate and Proposal

\r\nOnce we know your video requirements, we start creating a budget based on all the production element involved with your project. Occasionally, we may follow up with some additional clarifying questions. We hen create a short proposal outlining our understanding of the video and the goasl for the project. Included in this proposal is our estimate of what it’ll cost to produce the video. This phase of the process typically takes 1 to 3 days.\r\n

Start the Project

\r\nOnce you approve the proposal, we start the pre-production process working closely with you and your team to make sure we meet all your expectations.\r\n

Create Production Plan

\r\nOur first step in the pre-production phase is to create a production plan. To have a strategy in place before shooting any footage is essential to having a smooth production. This plan will include our steps along the way and the timing of those steps.\r\n

Story Creative

\r\nThe foundation for your video will be the story. Everything will center around this core aspect your video. Actors, makeup, wardrobe, locations, camera movements, and even editing styles are all based on the story. If you need help crafting the story, we have professional scriptwriters who can help. Or, if you have a script already, we can work with you to make sure it captures what you need at the budget we agreed upon.\r\n\r\nFor corporate productions that don’t require scripting, it’s good to work through the messages that need to be captured and conveyed in the video. This will determine the interview questions that will be asked during production.\r\n

Visual Design

\r\nAlong with the story comes the visual strategy for that story. The “look and feel” of the video will emerge during production, but by having a strategy in place for the visual design, we’ll be able to manage the creative for effectively.\r\n

Client Creative Approval

\r\nTo avoid any delays or additional costs, we must have the story creative approved before any cameras roll. Whether it’s a polished script or a list of management interviews, the story creative must be locked.\r\n

Shooting

\r\nOn the first day of shooting, our team will arrive with the approved shooting schedule, crew and production equipment. As with most productions, we will have a very specific timeline for the shoot day(s). While there may be some slight flexibility in the schedule, our goal will be to get in and capture all of the needed footage according to our timeline.\r\n

Editing the Video

\r\nOnce all of the footage is captured, it’s time to move into post-production. There are many levels to post-production. How this process flows depends on the delivery requirements. If there is a tight timeline, then some of the building of the video will happen concurrently. When there is time to work through the edit, then the following steps are typically handled sequentially:\r\n

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  • Review footage to find key message points
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  • Create a “rough cut” and get feedback
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  • Make revisions, create a “first cut” and get feedback
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  • Make final revisions and create a “final cut”
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  • Approve “final cut”
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Polishing the Video

\r\nOnce the “final cut” is approved, then we move into polishing of the video. This entails a variety of steps like:\r\n

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  • Clean up and balance the audio
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  • Drop in background music and mix all audio
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  • Color correct and color balance the clips
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  • Add any graphics, lower thirds or animations
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Approve

\r\nOnce the video has been polished, we present it to you for the final approval. It’s our goal to reach this stage of the production process with no more revisions or changes. Upon approval, we will then create a video master.\r\n

Distribute

\r\nWhether it’s broadcast, online or DVD, we will then use the video master to create a video for your distribution medium.\r\n

Pre-Production

Before the cameras roll, the first step to producing your video is proper planning. The key to a problem-free shoot (production) is to make sure you cover all the details in pre-production. The time spent in preparation will determine the success of your shoot. If you’re scrambling around to gather equipment or changing locations at the last minute, it will reflect on screen.\r\n\r\nFor one or two days of production, planning can move quickly. But for longer form videos that require more resources and longer shoot times, pre-production can require more extensive planning. And although proper planning will not guarantee a perfectly smooth production, it will help eliminate most of the issues that could degrade your production value.

Production

The day of the shoot has arrived. Hopefully, all of the prep work in pre-production has paid off and everything proceeds seamlessly. Again, great planning makes for a great shoot.\r\n\r\nOnce the cameras start rolling, the director will guide the shoot along, making sure all of the shots are captured or all the interview questions are answered thoroughly. It’s common to have multiple takes for a single scene or interview. In post-production, it’s normal to cut between various takes to capture the best performance or find the most passion or energy in a response.\r\n\r\nAfter the director has captured all of the visual elements needed, the shoot is “wrapped”, and production is over.

Post-Production

After all of the visual elements have been captured, it’s time to start the post-production process. Most people think of this phase of production as editing only, but there are actually many different steps that need to happen in post-production. The post-production phase can sometime take the longest time to complete. Revisions, approvals and the creative process can be time-consuming.

Distribution

Once the video is finished, it’s time to share it with the world. There are a variety of ways to distribute your video, and the key to knowing which distribution platform you should choose is to understand your target audience. What is the most likely way they would watch your video? What is the call to action in your video? How can they respond?\r\n\r\nAll of these questions need to be asked so that you can leverage your video’s distribution to reach your audience effectively.

Pre-Production
Production
Post-Production
Distribution

Video Production Timeline

Video Production Costs

Video Production Costs

We don’t believe in keeping our clients in the dark on what it costs to tell their story. While each project is totally unique, we are always proactive about providing accurate and reliable cost estimates for your video project.

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How much does a video cost?

\r\nVideo budgets can vary quite a bit. I’ve seen 30-second commercials as cheap as $500 and as expensive as $5 million. So, how much will your video cost?\r\n\r\nThere are multiple elements in video production that have a cost associated with them. Here are some typical examples of what will increase the cost of a production:\r\n

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  • Shooting in numerous locations
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  • Shooting with high-end, HD cameras
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  • Working with professional SAG actors from Los Angeles
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  • Using lots of computer graphics and animations
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  • Requiring extensive wardrobe and makeup
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  • Shooting multiple days
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  • Licensing iconic music for the video
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\r\nMany times, video production costs are given as “price per finished minute”, and this is sometimes used to estimate the “ballpark” cost before getting started. Marketing and promotional videos fall primarily into three categories and associated costs:\r\n

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  • Corporate Productions ($1,000 ~ $3,000 per finished minute)
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  • Narrative Stories ($2,000 ~ $5,000 per finished minute)
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  • Animations ($3,000 ~ $10,000 per finished minute)
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\r\nNote: These numbers should only be used as a starting point to estimate the costs of producing a video. For a more accurate estimate, give us a call and talk to one of our producers.\r\n

Corporate Productions

\r\nBusinesses often use corporate videos to promote a product or service that they provide. These types of video consist of:\r\n

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  • Interviews of leadership, marketing folks or subject matter experts
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  • B-Roll may include products, services, employees or manufacturing
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  • Slider and jib camera movement for B Roll footage
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  • Lower third graphics show the name and title of interviewee
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  • Opening and closing graphics of the company name and contact info
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  • Clean, balanced interview audio
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  • Subtle, instrumental background music
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  • Straightforward, simple editing
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\r\nIf there is no travel involved and the interviewees are readily available so that you can shoot all interviews and B Roll footage in one to two days, then the $1,000 to $3,000 per finished minute is a good estimate to start with. By adding more days, a variety of locations, additional editing for different versions, and travel, your production costs will increase accordingly.\r\n

Narrative Stories

\r\nA video that utilizes the narrative to communicate its message tend to be more expensive. Instead of sit down interviews and B-Roll, narrative stories tend to require more resources like actors, sets, props, wardrobe, makeup, more locations and unique story requirements.\r\n\r\nNarrative stories may include these kinds of videos:\r\n

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  • A day in the life of a consumer who uses your product
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  • A humorous storyline to communicate the benefits of your company
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  • An office setting that needs your service to operate efficiently
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\r\nWhen done properly, narrative stories can have incredible impact on the viewers.\r\n

Animations

\r\nAnother common video type is animation. This is where you build your entire video using photos, stock footage, computer graphics, 3D models and other non-captured assets. Like corporate and narrative stories, animation videos require quality scripting, tight editing, and good storytelling.\r\n\r\nAnimations tend to be more costly because each element on screen has to be created, modeled or rendered in sync with the script and narration. Assembling those elements in a clean, creative way takes time. Motion graphics artists will spend days, even weeks, building high-quality animations.\r\n\r\nAnimation videos tend to be used for the following:\r\n

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  • Trade show videos
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  • Marketing videos
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  • Online, web videos
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  • Corporate communication
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  • Service videos
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  • Work-flow and diagram videos
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How do we estimate the cost for your video?

\r\nWe start with lots of questions. The better we understand your video requirements, the more accurate we can estimate what it’ll cost to produce the video.\r\n\r\nThese are some of the questions we ask in the proposal process:\r\n

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  • Who is your target audience? Who do you want to watch these videos? Customers? Investors? Clients? Businesses? Mangers? Can you define your target demographic (people your trying to reach)? What is the social target: age, income, marital status, number of children, education level, etc. Is this video for a particular region (east cost, city, state, etc.), or nationwide, or global?
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  • What is the video about? What are you wanting to communicate through this video? Brand, company stability, services, offerings, value, training, a new product, etc.?
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  • Is it more like a documentary (facts, information and education), or more of a narrative story (fiction, storytelling, hypothetical use, etc.)?
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  • What are some emotions or feelings you would like to communicate? Trust, confidence, strength, etc.? List some adjectives that you’re want to convey about what you’re wanting to communicate through this video.
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  • What is the estimated length of the video? If you don’t know exactly the length, then estimate the range, like 8 to 10 minutes.
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  • Do you want to interview someone — company leaders (CEO, president, manages, etc.), strategic partners, random audience or customers, or a mixture of those? How many interviews do you expect per video or total?
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  • Do you want live action coverage shots (B-Roll) of certain things happening — factory lines, people at work, customers in their environment, etc.? If so, what are you looking for, and what do you want others to see?
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  • Do you need any special graphics or animations to demonstrate a technology, a process or something futuristic that’s not created yet?
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  • What distribution options are your considering? Website, YouTube, DVDs, Broadcast, etc.?
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  • Do you have a format preference: Standard Definition (SD) or High Definition (HD)? NTSC (Americas) or PAL (Europe)?
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\r\nOnce we know the answers to these questions, we simply plug in the details to a budgeting spreadsheet, and an accurate estimate is generated.